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NOTES ON RHODE ISLAND ORNITHOLOGY 



EDITED BY 

REGINALD HEBER HOWE, Jr. 



VOLUME I 



1^ 



BRISTOL, RHODE ISLAND 
■^^ 1900 



u'l ' A," ' 1 ii.ii .;i, ciju 



OCT 



1900 







« 






VOL. I 








NO. I 


/ ^, brf 










NOTES 


ON 


RHODE ISLAND 

JANUARY 


ORNITHOL 


-OGY 






1900 

BRISTOL 




- 






RHODE ISLAND 








OCT?:;: 1900 



NOTES ON RHODE ISLAND ORNITHOLOGY. 
Vol. I. JANUARY. No. i. 

Notes on Rhode Island Ornithology, a quarterly publication for 
the purpose of furthering interest in ornithology in the State of Rhode 
Island. Published and edited bj Reginald Heber Howe, Jr. Address, 
Longwood, Brookline, Massachusetts. 

Terms, seventj-five cents (.75) a year. Single numbers, twenty cents 
(.20). 

All material for publication, advertisements, and books for review 
should be sent to the Editor. 



It has been thought best for the convenience of bibliographers to 
change the title first proposed for the present publication, " Random 
Notes on Ornithology," to "Notes on Rhode Island Ornithology." 



The news of the death of Dr. ElUott Coues on Christmas day 
is received with deep regret. Perhaps the greatest tribute that 
can be paid him, is to say, that by the merit and usefulness of his 
many works, so widely has his reputation extended, that to-day 
his name, even to the most casual and humble student of birds, 
has become that of a friend. 



'THE JOURNAL OF WILLIAM JEFFERAY, 
GENTLEMAN.' 

From the reviews of a book lately published ' The Journal of 
William Jefferay, Gentleman,' we were led to look forward to a 
work containing matter of ornithological interest, at least of a 
bibliographic nature, to Rhode Island ornithologists. The vol- 
ume, however, now examined, appears in a new light, and unless 
carefully read might perhaps be misleading. 

' The Journal of William Jefferay, Gentleman ' is but the title of 
a book, spoken of as edited, but really written by John Osborne 
Austin. For some reason or other, the author has seen fit to 
write this delightful volume of fiction in the form of a journal ; 
' A DIARY THAT MIGHT HAVE BEEN ' as he calls it. It is supposed 
to be the Journal of one, William Jefferay, a true character, but 
not a diarist, who lived in Rhode Island from 1650 to 1675. 



2 Notes ON Rhode Island Ornithology. 

To turn to the portion of the work of interest to the ornitholo- 
gist we find the casual mention of the commoner birds from time 
to time and a few pages entirely devoted to birds, under the title 
of ' The Bird Excursion,' or a supposed walk in the neighborhood 
of Newport, on May 29, 1658. These particular pages men- 
tion some thirty-two birds, all well known inhabitants of Rhode 
Island, and the recording of them must be looked upon only as 
of the year 1899, and not of the last half of the seventeenth 
century. 



LETTERS. 
Remarks on the Autumn Water Bird Migration at Sakonnet. 

Grant, Fla., Dec. 18, 1899. 

To the Editor of Notes on Rhode Island Ornithology : — 

All my notes about the fall shooting with dates etc. are at 
Sakonnet, so I cannot be very exact in details. 

I have never known so poor a flight of the various shore birds 
as occurred this past summer and fall in Rhode Island, at least 
so far as my observations go. 

The locality is not a good one for shore bird shooting. The 
marsh there does not lay well in the line of flight, and a large 
percentage of the birds go by off-shore.' It is also overrun most 
of the time by crabbers and that curse and nuisance to all decent 
sportsmen, the "Peep Shooter." 

To illustrate this off-shore flight, I was a witness some years 
ago of a very interesting sight. It was about the third week in 
August, and had rained heavily in the night with some wind from 
the southeast. At daylight it was quite foggy and the wind died 
out almost to a calm. Flock after flock of the large Yellow Legs 

{Totamis ?nelanoleucus) came in from over the sea, made the land 
near West Island, flew east about a mile, and went off to sea 

again. This continued until about 11 a. m. ; then the weather 
cleared, and I saw no more of them ; they flew high and none 

were killed. There were more birds in that morning flight than 

I have ever seen in this locality all put together. It would have 



1 



Notes on Rhode Island Ornithology. 2 

been very interesting to find out if these were all old birds, as the 
July, August, and September birds usually are. 

I noted a great scarcity of Pectoral Sandpipers {Tringa 7nacu- 
lata) the past fall, these are usually very abundant on our 
marshes in October, the late flight consists of young birds small 
and poor, and not worth shooting, this year what few there were 
were old birds. There was also a small flight of Stilt Sandpipers 
{^Micropalama himantopus) in October, which is late for them, 
All together it was an off year in Rhode Island for shore birds, 
and I, personally, took nothing of special interest. 

Yours very truly, 

Newton Dexter. 



GENERAL NOTES. 

Notes from Newport. — Compared with former years, few sea birds 
have been seen along the coast near Newport this fall. There have, 
however, been gi-eat flocks of Scoters {Oidemia) and a large number of 
Black Ducks {Anas obscura) on Narragansett Bay. On the ocean, Loons 
(Gavia imber), Cormorants {Phalacrocorax carbo) and Old Squaws (//e/-- 
elda hyemalis] have been observed, but not in their usual numbers. This 
is no doubt due to the warm weather that has prevailed up to now 
(December 14th) the shallow waters of Narragansett Bay have not be- 
come too cold for the comfort of the Scoters and Black Ducks, so they 
have not been forced to seek the deeper and warmer water of the ocean. 
The high temperature also accounts for the scarcity of the hardier ocean 
birds, such as the Horned Grebes (Colymbus auritus)^ Loons, Cormor- 
ants, Old Squaws, and Eider Ducks (^Soniateria dresseri) which have 
not yet felt the necessity of coming south. 

Off shore, the Kittiwakes {Rtssa tridactyla) follow about the cod 
fishermen, feeding on the scraps of bait cast overboard. So accustomed 
have they become to finding food in the vicinity of boats, and so little 
have they been disturbed by man, that while rowing off shore on the 
30th of November, five at different times came up from the horizon 
straight to my boat and hovered about within a few feet. On this same 
day two Razor-billed Auks {Alca tarda) flew past, and I secured another 
on November 29th off Sachuest Point. No less unexpected was the 
appearance of three Harlequin Ducks {Histriouictis histrionicus) on No- 
vember 28th which were discovered in the vicinity of Cormorant Rock, 
and appeared quite tame. The flock consisted of a male and two females, 
of which I shot the male and one of the females. So far, this fall, the 



A. Notes on Rhode Island Ornithology. 

Cormorant Rock colony of Cormorants is much smaller than last year. 
At present it consists of no more than twenty-five birds, all of which are 
the Common Connorants {Phalacrocorax carbo) no double-crested {Phal- 
acrocorax dilophus) having been noted. The Cormorants here are par- 
ticularly fond of lighting on the tops of spar buoys, and the one south 
of the rock is seldom unoccupied. I have never seen a Cormorant 
contest the privilege of sitting there if another approached with the 
evident intention of alighting. The occupant always flys away just in 
time for the new comer to alight. 

On shore a later date for Sora (^Porzana carolifia) was established, 
when one was taken by Mr. H. W. H. Powel at Almy's Pond on Novem- 
ber loth. Mr. Powel also took one on the day previous, the 9th, at 
Wilbur's Swamp. 

A flock of about fifty Canada Geese {Brattta canadensis) passed over 
Providence going south on December 24, 1899. 

Mr. H. W. H. Powel says that the Shoveller Duck {Spatula clypeata) 
was not at all uncommon in "old times" in the southwest corner of 
Easton's Pond, Newport, where there used to be a bar in the reeds on 
which they would be found feeding. He has taken at least nine at this 
spot, but has never seen them in other parts of the Pond, except in 
company with flocks of Teal or Ruddy Ducks. Allen's Restaurant now 
stands where this bar made out into the Pond. 
Newport, December 24, 1899. Edward Sturtevant. 

An Error. — The Long-tailed Chickadee {Parus septetttrionalis) men- 
tioned in the Hypothetical List in "The Birds of Rhode Island," p. 90, 
Mr. J. M. Southwick has kindly forwarded to me for identification. 
After careful examination and comparison of the specimen, I find the 
bird to be our common Chickadee {Parus atricapillus). Editor. 

Cepphus grylle Inland : A Mr. Lannigan shot a male Black Guillemot 
on the Taunton River, Mass., on November 19, 1899, and is now in my 
possession. The capture being near the Rhode Island line is no doubt of 
interest to Rhode Island observers. 

Fall River, Dec. 12, 1899. Owen Durfee. 

A New Bird for Rhode Island. — I have to record the first record for 
the Ring-billed Gull {Larus dela-ivarensis) for the State. A young bird 
taken at Narragansett Bay in February 1891. The specimen is now in 
the Charles H. Smith collection at Roger Williams Park, Providence. 

South Auburn, December 19, 1899. Harry S. Hathaway. 

Odd Notes. — Briinnich's Murres {Uria lomvia) have several times 
been reported this winter, and I have seen six which have recently been 
taken in our waters. The first was captured November 26th, at Point 
Judith. 



Notes on Rhode Island Ornithology. C 

The first Snowy Owl {Nyctea nyctea) of the wintei", a female, was 
killed within a short distance of ni}' house in South Auburn, on the 
Warwick side of the Pawtuxet River, on November 30th. The bird has 
been placed in the Charles H. Smith collection at Roger Williams Park, 
Providence. On December loth four were seen on the beach at Point 
Judith. On Nov. 19, 1899, at Point Judith a single Long-billed Marsh 
Wren (^Cistothorus palustris) was seen. Possibly the bird is wintering. 

An unusually large flock of American Coot {Fulica americana) have 
been feeding in Point Judith pond this fall, and were still there on De- 
cember loth. They are locally called " Sea Crows." 

On the nth of December a Great Blue Heron {Ardea herodias) was 
seen flying across Point Judith pond, and two large flocks of Canada 
Geese {Branta canadensis) were seen flying southward. 

A Dovekie { Alle alle) was killed on December 14th at Point Judith. 
And a male Brant [Branta bernicla) was taken at Block Island on 
December i6th, 1899. 
South Auburn, December 19, 1899. Harry S. Hathaway. 

Another 1886 R. I. Record for Puffinus borealis. — I lately found a 
female. Cory's Shearwater, taken off Brenton's Reef, Newport, in Octo- 
ber, 18S6, in the possession of Mr. William Hodgkinson of Bristol. 
Longwood. Editor. 



51 0-^ 






The Birds of Rhode Island 

BY 

REGINALD HEBER HOWE, JR., 

AND 

EDWARD STURTEVANT, S. B., 

THE FIRST AND ONLY COMPLETE LIST OF 
THE BIRDS OF THE STATE. ... 



IN TWO EDITIONS. 
PLAIN COVER, CLOTH, $1.25. 

DESIGNED COVER, " . $2.00. 

Postage extra. 



FOR COPIES ADDRESS £_ STURTEVANT 

' ST. GEORGE'S SCHOOL, 

NEWPORT, 

R. I. 



Two Interesting New Books, 

LITTLE BEASTS OF FIELD AND WOOD. 

BY WILLIAM EVERETT CRAM. PRICE $1.25. 

This book treats of some of the commoner of the little beasts which 
inhabit our Northeastern States, and has twentj-four remarkable full 
page illustrations bj the author. 

" The studies are so interesting that readers on later excursions will 
profit by them."~Z'^e Nation. 



ON THE BIRDS' HIGHWAY. 

BY REGINALD HEBER HOWE, JR. PRICE $2.00. 

With over sixty photographic illustrations bj the Author, and a 
frontispiece in colors after a painting by Louis Agassiz Fuertes. 

" A record and a promise of what a knowledge of birds can give 
man." — The Outlook. 



Either of these books will be sent postpaid on receipt of 
price by the Publishers, 

SMALL, MAYNARD & COMPANY, - - - BOSTON. 









• 


VOL. I 






NO. 2 


11,^ 




• 




NOTES 


ON 


RHODE ISLAND 


ORNITHOLOGY 


- 




APRIL 




- 


- 


1900 








K" 




' 




BRISTOL 
RHODE ISLAND 

• 


* * 



ippip^^^"^^^^?^^-^-'^' 






'1 



OCT '900 



NOTES ON RHODE ISLAND ORNITHOLOGY. 



Vol. I. APRIL. No. 2. 



Notes on Rhode Island Ornithology, a quarterly publication for 
the purpose of furthering interest in ornithology in the State of Rhode 
Island. Published and edited by Reginald Heber Howe, Jr. Address, 
Longwood, Brookline, Massachusetts. 

Terms, seventy-five cents (.75) a year. Single numbers, twenty cents 
(.20). 

All material for publication, advertisements, and books for review 
should be sent to the Editor. 



GENERAL NOTES. 

Odd Notes of Interest. — On September 13, 1899, a Dowitcher {Mac- 
rorhamp]uts) was taken at Middletown which Mr. William Brewster has 
kindly examined and pronounced to be intermediate between grisens and 
scolopaceusi. 

In September, 1S95, a Crested Cardinal {Parioria cuctclaia) an inhabit- 
ant of South America, was taken on Brenton's Pt., Newport. It was 
undoubtedly an escaped cage bird. 

On Jan. 9, 1900, I had the opportunity of securing alive a Bonaparte's 
Gull {^Larus Philadelphia) on Narragansett Bay. As the bird had onh' 
been slightly injured I resolved to see if it would live in captivity. The 
experiment has since proved entirely successful and the bird has become 
extremely tame and does not seem to mind its lack of freedom. 
Newport, R. I., March i, 1900. LeRoy King. 

Cuckoos at Block Island. — While at Block Island during the first ten 
days of August, 1S99, I noticed a number of Cuckoos [Coccyziis] whether 
Yellow-billed {ainerica?ia) or Black-billed (^erythrophthalmus) I did not 
make sure. Their occurrence on the Island seemed of interest on 
account of the lack of trees. 
Boston. I'ebrunry 6, 1900. Outram Bangs. 

Winter Notes from Middletown. — 1 spent from Januarj' 23 to 28, 1900, 
at Middletown, with Mr. Reginald Heber Howe, Jr. Inuring our stay we 
observed the following birds of interest : 

Red-throated Loon [Gavia lumme). — Two were seen off Easton's 
Beach on the 25th and 27th. 

Briinnich's Murre {Urin loinvia). — -One was taken on the 24th off 
Easton's Point. 

Bonaparte's Gull {Larits Philadelphia'). — A fiock of about fifty birds, 



8 Notes on Rhode Island Ornithology. 

out of which two were taken, were seen on the 24th and 27th along 
Easton's Beach. 

Marsh Hawk {Circus kudsoniics). — A single bird was seen on the 
Third Beach marshes on the 26th and 27th. 

Horned Lark [Otocoris alpestris). — A large flock of over one hundred 
birds were seen on the uplands of Sachuest Point on the 24th, 26th, and 
27th. A male taken measured Lth. 7.00, Wg. 4.28, T. 2.81, Tar. .98, B. 
cul. .50 or almost as small as O. a. fraticola. 

Savannah Sparrow {Amtnodramus sand-wichensis savanna). — One 
bird was taken on the 24th on the Third Beach marshes, and another bird 
was seen on the 26th perhaps of the same species. The only other record 
to mj knowledge of the wintering of this species in New England, this 
being the first for Rhode Island, is the recording of two birds at Sand- 
wich, Cape Cod, Mass., in December, 1894 (see Auk, Vol. XII, p. 188). 

Song Sparrow {Melosfiza fasciaia). — A flock of fifteen birds were 
seen along an old stone wall on the exposed uplands of Sachuest Point 
on the 24th. Both the place, and the number of birds seems very un- 
usual. 

On the afternoon of the 24th with Mr. Edward Sturtevant we at- 
tempted to reach Cormorant Rock, but owing to increasing wind, dark- 
ness, and rough water we were unable to land. We, however, started 
from the rock the wintering colony of Common Cormorants {P/ialacro- 
corax carbd) and a flock of over one hundred Black Duck {Anas obscura). 
Boston, Mass., Feb. i, 1900. George C. Shattuck. 

Bluebirds in January. —On January 5, 1900, I went by train from 
Providence to Wickford Junction, and saw between those points Blue- 
birds, once surely and on two other occasions, I believe. After the first 
two flocks, I got a seat on the other side of the car where the sun was 
behind me and then I got the bright blue. The others v/ere identified 
by size, shape and flight. Perhaps half a dozen in all. 
Belmont, Feb. 28, 1900. Ralph Hoffmann. 

White-winged Crossbills, Pine Grosbeaks, and other Winter Birds 
Observed. — On the morning of the 14th of January, 1900, I noted the 
following birds at Neutaconkanut Hill, Johnston, Pine Grosbeaks 
{Pintcola enucleator canadensis) White-winged Crossbills {Loxia leucop- 
tera). Pine Siskins {Pinus spinas) Purple Finches {Carpodacus purpu- 
reus) Redpolls {Acanthis liiiaria) and American Goldfinches {Astni^- 
alinus tristis) and I think Red Crossbills {Loxia c. minor.) They were 
feeding on birch buds and were very tame, allowing me to approach 
within a few feet. I returned in the afternoon and secured a fine male 
White-winged Crossbill which I believe to be the first authentic record 
for the State. 

On January 30 I shot a female White-winged Crossbill at the same 
locality, and on February ist and 2nd at the Country Club below Paw- 



i 



Notes on Rhode Island Ornithology. g 

tucket, thej were equally common with the Red Crossbills. A male, 

female, and young male from those shot at the Country Club are to be 

placed in the Charles H. Smith Collection at Roger Williams Park. I 

also saw a White-winged Crossbill on February ist in Roger Williams 

Park. 

Providence, March loth, 1900. Edward H. Armstrong- 

A Late Siskin in R. I. — During a heavy, chilly fog, on May 31, 1897, 
I saw a Siskin hopping about on the branches of one of the ornamental 
evergreens on the lawn of Mr. Grosvenor's house at Newport. 
West Point, N. Y., Feb. 15th, 1900. Wirt Robinson. 

A Scoter on Land and Other Notes. — At eight o'clock on the morn- 
ing of October 11, 1898, my attention was called to a Duck on the tennis 
court in front of St. George's School. The school is situated about two 
hundred yards from the ocean exposed cfiffs of Newport, and the tennis 
court is less than forty yards from the piazza. The bird, an adult Surf 
Scoter {Oidemia ferspicillata) was walking about, and apparently paying 
no attention to a group of boys on the ^'va.7.7.2l. 

The bird was shot as it flew off and proved to be a fine specimen in per- 
fect health. Why it lit so near houses I am unable to saj'. It could 
not have walked up the steep cliffs. There were no tame ducks in the 
neighborhood to attract it. Probably it became exhausted while flying, 
and was obliged to alight. 

A Briinnich's Murre {Uria lo7nvia) was found on February 22, 
1900, on Easton's Beach. Master Austin Sands tells me that on March 11, 
1900, he saw two male Red-headed Woodpeckers {Melanerpes erythro- 
cephalus) in his yard at Newport. I have every reason to believe his 
identification correct. 

Two Barred Owls {Syniium nebulosuin) have wintered in Newport not 
far from Bellevue Avenue. One of these was taken on March 12, 1900. 
Newport, March 13, 1900. Edward Sturtevant. 

Sea Fowl Notes. — On February 24th, 1900, I saw several flocks of 
Ducks on the wing which must have numbered over a thousand. The 
Providence River has been frozen over as far as Gaspee Pt., and the air 
holes are full of Ducks, mostly Greater Scaup {Aythya marila). Whistlers 
(^Clajigula c. americana), Buffleheads f^Charitoiieita albeola') and Scoters 
(^Oidemia). 
Providence, March 2nd, 1900. Edward H. Armstrong. 

Wintering Robins and Bluebirds. — Bluebirds ( Sinlia sialis) and Robins 
{Mcrnla migratoria) have been seen in different parts of the State in 
numbers all winter. Five Bluebirds have passed the last three months in 



TO Notes on Rhode Island Ornithology. 

a group of pines, a short distance from raj home at South Auburn, so it 
is inipossible to state when the first arrivals from tlie south reached here. 
South Auburn, March 15, 1900. H. S. Hathaway. 

SPRING ARRIVAL NOTES 1900. 

Killdeers (^^Sgia litis vocifercC). 

March 7, Pawtuxket, Y. E. Newbury. 
Killdeers (^^^gialitis vocifera). 

Two, March 19, Newport, Le Roy King. 
Red-winged Blackbirds {Agelaius ^kcenicetis). 

Seven, March 17, Portsmouth, E. Sturtevant. 
Phoebe (Sayornis p/iocbe). 

One, March 8, South Auburn, H. S. Hathawa\'. 
Red-winged Blackbird {Agelaius fhmtiicetcs) . 

One, March 8, Soutli Auburn, H. S. Hathaway. 
Grackles {^uiscalus quiscula or cBneus}). 

Large flock,. March 12, Auburn, H. S. Hathaway. 
Grackles {^iiisceilus quiscula or ceneus'^). 

Fifteen, March 7, Bristol Ferry, H. S. Hathawayi 
Song Sparrows {Melospiza fasciaia). 

Common, March 9, Newport, E. Sturtevant. 
Robins [Merida niigratorici). 

A few arrivals, March 11, Newport, Austin Sands. 

REVIEWS. 

The Birds of Eastern North America, by Charles B. Cory, Field Co- 
lumbian Museum, Chicago, 1899. 

This is another of Mr. Cory's Keys. It suggests a sort of " Gray's 
Botany" of birds, which though giving the most ignorant the power 
to identify our birds, is so brief in text, and so mechanical in makeup, 
that its skeleton nature is rather unpleasant to the ornithologists who 
love birds for their personality. The work is profusely illustrated, and 
will no doubt prove of great assistance to many whose main desire is 
to name the birds they see or that fall into their hands. 

PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED. 

Bird-Lore, Vol. II, No. i, Feb., 1900. 

Nature Study Leaflet. Our Common Birds, by C. F. Hodge, Ph.D. 
Bio. Series No. 2 Worcester, Mass., 1899. 

The Condor, Vol. II, No. 1, Jan., Feb., 1900. 

The Journal of the Maine Ornithological Society, Vol.11, No. i, Jan., 
1900. 

The Osprey, Vol. IV, No. 5, Jan., 1900. 

The Western Ornithologist, Second Series, Vol. V. No. i. Jan. and 
Feb., iqoo. 



Two Interesting Nezv Books, 

LITTLE BEASTS OF FIELD AND WOOD. 

BY WILLIAM EVERETT CRAM. PRICE $1.25. 

This book treats of some of the commoner of the little beasts which 
inhabit our Northeastern States, and has twentj-four remarkable full 
page illustrations by the author. 

"The studies are so interesting that readers on later excursions will 
profit by them." — The Nation. 



ON THE BIRDS' HIGHWAY. 

BY REGINALD HEBERHOWE, JR. PRICE $2.00. 

With over sixty photographic illustrations by the Author, and a 
frontispiece in colors after a painting by Louis Agassiz Fuertes. 

" A record and a promise of what a knowledge of birds can give 
man." — The Otitlook. 



Either of these books will be sent postpaid on receipt of 

price by the Publishers, 

SMALL, MAYNARD & COMPANY, - - - BOSTON. 

Do you want to know the warblers? 

Then you want The Wilson Bttllctin, No. 30, 
'Waftler Songs/ because in it are described the 
songs of 46 species of warblers. Nowhere else will 
you find so many carefully described. 



Send twenty-five one cent stamps to Lynds Jones Oberlin. 
Ohio, to-day and receive a copy by return mail. 

SPECIMENS FOR SALE. 

OVER 1,000,000 

STUFFED ANIMALS, HEADS, BIRDS, 
BIRD SKINS, EGGS, CURIOES, also 

ALL KINDS OF SUPPLIES USED BY 
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Send 10 cents for Complete Lists, 



Frank Blake Webster Go. Hyde Park, Mass., U. S. A. 



The Birds of Rhode Island 

BY 

REGINALD HEBER HOWE, JR., - 

AND 

EDWARD STURTEVANT, S. B., 

THE FIRST AND ONLY COMPLETE LIST OF 
THE BIRDS- OF THE STATE. ... 



IN TWO EDITIONS. 

PLAIN COVER, CLOTH, $1.25. 

DESIGNED COVER, " . $2.00. 

Postage *extra. 



FOR COPIES ADDRESS g^ STURTEVANT 

ST. GEORGE'S' SCHOOL, 

NEWPORT, 

R. I. 



« 



THE CONDOR, 



^9 
(BULLETIN OF THE COOPER ORNITHOLOGICAL CLUB.) 



Piablished B5=noetlhly, $1 per Yean 



Edited by CHESTER BARLOW. Associated with Harry 
R. Taylor and Howard Robertson. 

THE CONDOR is a large octavo 20 to 24 page journal of 
Pacific Coast ornithology, filled with articles of special interest 
and value, from numerous field workers, and illustrated. 

Can you afford to miss the progress of ornithology in the Great 
West by not including the CONDOR in your list?, 

$1 per Year. Sample Copy, 20 cents. Volume I, complete $1. 

Address communications to C. Barlow, Editor. Santa Clara, 
Cal., or Donald A. Cohen, Business Manager, Alameda, Cal. 



VOL. I NO. 3 



NOTES ON RHODE ISLAND ORNITHOLOGY 



JULY 



1900 



BRISTOL 
RHODE ISLAND 






J. A. ALLEN, F. M. CHAPMAN, 

Editor. Assoc. Editor. 

THE AUK. 

A Quarterly Journal of Ornithology* 

OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE AMERICAN 
ORNITHOLOGISTS' UNION. 



As the official organ of the Union, 'The Auk' 
is the leading ornithological publication of this 
country. Each number contains about loo pages of 
text, a handsomely colored plate, and other illustra- 
tions. The principal articles are by recognized 
authorities, and are of both a scientific and popular 
nature. The department of ' General Notes ' gives 
brief records of new and interesting facts concerning 
birds, contributed by observers from throughout the 
United States and Canada. Recent ornithological 
literature is reviewed at length, and news items are 
commented upon by the editors. 'The Auk' is thus 
indispensable to those who would be kept informed 
of the advance made in the study of birds, either in 
the museum or in the field. 

Price of Current Volume^ $3. Single Numbers, 75 cts. 



Address L. S. FOSTER, 



% 



33 PINE STREET, - = NEW YORK CITY. 



OCT r :) 1900 



NOTES ON RHODE ISLAND ORNITHOLOGY. 



Vol. I. JULY. No. 3. 



Notes on Rhode Island Ornithology, a quarterly publication for 
the purpose of furthering interest in ornithology in the State of Rhode 
Island. Published and edited by Reginald Heber Howe, Jr. Address, 
Longwood, Brookline, Massachusetts. 

Terms, seventy-five cents (.75) a year. Single numbers, twenty cents 
(.20). 

All material for publication, advertisements, and books for review 
should be sent to the Editor. 



SPRING MIGRATION AT SOUTH AUBURN. 
By Harry S. Hathaway. 

The arrival of birds near and around my home this spring has 
been on about an average with previous years, although a few 
species were a few days late on account of the cold and windy 
month of May, [This is interesting in the light of the remark- 
ably large and varied migration in Eastern Massachusetts. Ed.] 
We have none of the waves that are noted at other places, the 
" fly lines " being north of Providence, extending from the Con- 
necticut River valley to Boston. The birds that we have come 
direct to their former breeding grounds, and what few northern 
residents that do pass through are well scattered and not in the 
"troops" that are seen in other places. Several Robins and 
Bluebirds wintered near here, and the date of their arrival from 
the south was uncertain. Redwing Blackbirds were first seen 
on March 8, Bronzed Grackles {^Quiscalus quisada ceneus ?) 
in a flock of one hundred, came on the 12th, and on the 27th the 
first Cowbird was seen. By the first of April the above species 
were abundant. The first four Tree Swallows, a Vesper, and 
several Fieljd Sparrows were seen April 8th, and on the 15th the 
rattle of the Kingfisher was heard along the Pawtuxet River. 
Easter Sunday, the 15th, the first Chipping Sparrow, and two White- 
throated Sparrows arrived, while Juncos, Field and Vesper Spar- 
rows, Yellow-rumped Warblers in summer plumage, and Tree Swal- 



1 2 Notes on Rhode Island Ornithology. 

lows were abundant. The first Night Heron was noted on the i6th 
and two Crossbills (species?) were seen flying over. The 17th a 
Hermit Thrush was seen feeding in the woods across the river. 
On April 20th the first Yellow-palm Warbler, and two Ruby- 
crowned Kinglets appeared in my orchard, and the sweet song of 
the latter was heard for three days. Two Chewinks, and the last 
Crossbills (species ?) were heard on the 21st, while on the 22nd 
the first Brown Thrashers, and the most of the Chipping Spar- 
rows arrived. A Great Blue Heron flew over my yard, and the 
first Barn Swallows came on the 23rd. On the 26th three male 
Black and White Warblers and a flock of twenty Chimney 
Swifts arrived despite the hard northerly winds of the week 
previous, it being late for the former. On the 27th Bob-whites 
commenced whistling across the river. The warm wave of April 
29th brought the first Least Flycatchers (2), and three Yellow 
Warblers. The first of May, Ovenbirds in numbers. Kingbirds 
and Spotted Sandpipers arrived. 

When I opened my door on the morning of May 2nd, I was 
greeted by the song of the first Scarlet Tanager, and a Yellow- 
throated Vireo in company with his mate, in the trees in my yard, 
while the first Maryland Yellow-throats, and three Rusty Black- 
birds were singing across the river. 

I heard the first male Redstart, and a Rose-breasted Grosbeak 
singing on the 4th, and the last Yellow-rump Warbler had departed 
May 5th. The first Catbird, Wood Thrush, and a Warbling Vireo 
arrived on the 6th. On the 8th there was quite a well marked 
wave, which brought along the first four Chestnut-sided, a Black- 
throated Green, and several Prairie Warblers, two Wilson's 
Thrushes, and Baltimore Orioles. A White-eye Vireo arrived on 
the 9th. 

Despite the cold frosty morning of the lOth, three Red-eyed 
Vireos, and a Crested Flycatcher were heard for the first time. 
May 14th, first Indigo Bird, and two Small-billed Water Thrushes 
were heard, and on the 15th several Black-poll Warblers, and a 
Wood Pewee were seen. The Yellow-throated Vireos have their 
nest started 40 feet up in a chestnut tree not 15 feet from my 
house and some 10 feet from their home of last year. The first 
Cuckoo (species ?) and a Yellow-breasted Chat were heard on 



Notes on Rhode Island Ornithology. 12 

the 1 6th, and a Blackburnian Warbler was singing in my tree tops 
on the morning of the 17th. Two Wilson's Warblers, and a 
Canadian Warbler were noted on the i8th, a Black-throated Blue 
Warbler was seen the 21st, and the three Small-billed Water 
Thrushes which have been resting along my brook, moved along 
to their breeding grounds. May 22nd I saw the first two Magnolia 
Warblers, and oa the 28th a Ruby-throated Hummingbird had 
laid in her nest her two eggs. 

On the 31st the last Black-poll Warbler was seen, which ended 
the migration. 

No new species were seen, and on the whole the migration was 
very regular, and of no unusual interest. 



GENERAL NOTES. 

The Bonaparte's Gull which was noted by my brother, Le Roy King, in 
the April number of this magazine is still living and in very good health. 
It is now taking on the summer plumage — the black head — without ap- 
parently moulting, for no trace of feathers can be found in its cage. 

On May 15, 1900, I saw a pair of Orchard Orioles (^Icterus sfurius) on 
Brenton's Point, and on May 27th I saw another pair which I have every 
reason to believe were not the first. 
Newport, June i, 1900. Frederick R. King. 

A Lesser Snow Goose i^Chen hyferborea) was captured at Easton's 
Pond, Newport, by Mr. F. P. Sands early in the fall of 1876. It was the 
only one seen at the time, and is at present in my collection. 
Newport, June 5, 1900. Austin L. Sands. 

Notes from Newport. — A new colony of Bank Swallows {Clivicola 
riparia) was discovered at Brenton's Point this spring by Masters 
Frederick R. King and Austin L. Sands. It consists of forty-five burrows 
in the ocean exposed bank at the end of the point. During the cold 
northeast storm of May 19, I saw a flock of twenty-three Cliff Swallows 
{Petrochelido7i hmifrotis) on the second Beach. They were taking shel- 
ter in the lee of the dunes. I have never before seen so many here. 

On May 18 I saw a Slate-colored Junco (^Junco hyemalis). This is a 
late date for them. 
Newport, June 4, 1900. Edward Sturtevant. 

Notes from Newport. — Ringed-billed Gull {Larus delawarenst's)., — In 
April, 1899, several Gulls probably of this species though not positively 
identified were observed. From November 5 to 21, 1899, about twenty 



14 Notes on Rhode Island Ornithology. 

were seen and positively identified, though none were shot; both young 
and adults were feeding with the Herring Gulls near the place where 
garbage is dumped into Narragansett Bay, at Foft Adams, R. I. 

American Merganser {Merganser ainericanus). — Common on Narra- 
gansett Bay from February 20 to April 25, 1899. 

Hooded Merganser {Lofhodytes cucullatus). — A female and a young 
male, mounted by Mr. Charles B. Clark of Newport, were shot on the 
marshes near Second Beach, in October, 1899. The young male was pur- 
chased by Mr. Harry S. Hathaway, of Providence, for the Smith collection. 

King Eider {Somateria spectabilis). — A male was taken off Conanicut. 
Island during the winter of 1898-99. Seen mounted in a store in James- 
town. 

Hudsonian Godwit {JLimosa hcemasticd). — One flew close to our 
house, at Fort Adams, August 7, 1899. 

Killdeer {/Egialitis vociferd). — AKilldeerwas seen on the extreme 
south end of the Island of Rhode Island, March 4, 1900, and one on the 
neighboring golf fields March 28. 

American Long-eared Owl (Ast'o -wilsonianus). — One was shot in a 
thicket near Fort Adams, February 20, igoo. 

Great Horned Owl {Bubo virginianus). — On November 20, 1899, 
Mr. Isaac Clark lay concealed beside a small pond on Conanicut Island, 
watching a muskrat that he was trying to shoot. Intent on killing the 
muskrat that had given trouble by injuring the dam, Mr. Clark asur- 
prised to see the animal suddenly dive. Looking up, the cause was dis- 
covered. A Great Horned Owl {Bubo virginianus) was flying overhead, 
also intent on capturing the muskrat. A pair wintered at the stone- 
crusher in the quarry near the Bonaparte house, south of Newport, 
during the winter of 1899-1900. I heai'd that one of them was shot in 
February or March. They also fed on muskrats, as indicated by skulls 
found about their feeding ground. A Great Horned Owl was seen by 
Mr. Philip Peckham, at Middletown, in May, 1900. 

Orchard Oriole {Icterus spurius). — June 18, 1899, a young male of 
the second year was singing in an apple orchard near Fort Adams, where 
a nest was subsequently seen. Two were found in the same orchard 
May 27, 1900. 

Snow Bunting {Plectrofhenax nivalis). — My father collected an adult 
(No. 11,895 collection of Edgar A. Mearns), November 10, 1899, which 
was moulting; all rectrices and some wing quills were just sprouting. 
This bird was alone on the rocky shore at Fort Adams. Another was 
seen there two days later. 

Tree S'pavrovr {Spizella monticola'). — Arrived November 7, 1899,011 
which date not less than 100 were seen and a specimen collected. 

Yellow-breasted Chat {Icteria viretis). — Chats bred in a swampy 
thicket near Fort Adams, in June, 1899. They disappeared before the 
end of summer. They returned to the same locality May 23, 1900. Sev- 
eral pairs were found in thickets along streams in the vicinity of Hang" 
ing Rock, Middletown, R. I., June 2, 1900. 



• 



Notes on Rhode Island Ornithology. I^ 

Grey-cheeked Thrush {Hylocic/da alicics). — Two were observed in 
our yard at Fort Adams, October 7,1899; one seen near Fort Adams, 
R. I., May 20, 1900. 
Fort Adams, Newport, R. I. Louis di Zerega Mearns. 

A Large-billed Water Thrush's Nest taken in R. I. — On May 20th 
while on a collecting trip with Mr. H. S. Hathaway we stopped on a bridge 
over a small stream in Kent County and heard the song of a Louisiana 
Water Thrush (^Seiiirus moiact'lla^, and went into the nearby woods in an 
endeavor to locate a nest. We worked our way up the stream, examining 
the roots of every upturned tree and every location it seemed possible for 
these birds to breed in, and finally gave it up in disgust and started back 
to the road, and in passing along the foot of a steep bank near the stream, 
I saw a good looking situation and going nearer to examine it more closely 
a female Water Thrush flew almost into my face disclosing her nest and 
fine eggs. The nest was a bulky aiFair composed of leaves and coarse 
grass, lined with finer grass and a few hairs and was placed in a depres- 
sion in bank underneath the exposed roots of a tree growing on top of 
bank, and was well hidden. The eggs were somewhat incubated, and the 
nest was only a few feet from the running stream. I know of no record 
of the eggs of this species having been taken, although several have 
reported seeing young birds. 
Providence, May 22, 1900. F. E. Newbury. 

First Record of the Greater Redpoll (^Acanthus linaria rostrata) in R. L 
— On the afternoon of March 14, 1S96, at East Providence from a flock of 
about twenty Redpolls, which were feeding in white birches, I shot six 
specimens, two of which have since been identified as Greater Redpolls, 
(^Acaiithus linaria rostrata^. They were $ 's all in the immature plumage- 
South Auburn. H. S. Hathaway. 

Another Cape May Warbler Record. — Mrs. Julia M. Hill writes me 
that on May 20, 1900, with her son, she observed a Warbler, which from 
her careful description leaves no doubt as to its identity as a male 
Dejidfoica tigrina, in a snowball bush at Chepachet. Later in the day 
she saw it again, or possible another individual, in an apple tree. 

Editor. 

Birds Observed at Sakonnet Point and Vicinity. — In a brief visit to 
Sakonnet Point from June 2 to June 6, 1900, the following birds, mainly 
residents, were observed. The country under observation extended about 
a mile north from the point and four miles east to Tunipus Pond, while 
a visit was made to Cormorant Rock which lies offshore about three miles 
west of Sakonnet. The point and the land along shore is for half a mile 
inland bare of trees, except three small islands in the marsh north of 
Warren's Point which are covered with a tall growth of oaks and on each 



1 6 . Notes on Rhode Island Ornithology. 

there are a few cedar trees, and thus the birds seen are those species 
which nest on the ground or in the " cat-tails" of Long Pond. 

Common Tern (^Sterna kirtindo). — The first bird which attracts _your 
attention on the approach of the boat to Sakonnetis this species, which is 
seen resting on the posts which support the nets of the fish pounds in the 
Sakonnet River. On Cormorant Rock there were between forty and fifty 
birds noted sitting on their eggs or on the rocks, while there were as 
many more flying to and fro across Sakonnet Point and up the river feed- 
ing. The day we visited the rock, June 5, there were five nests (if such 
they may be called, being composed entirely of fish bones) which con- 
tained three eggs, three nests of two, and four with only one egg. 

Greater Shearwater {^Puffinus gravis). — Intermingled with the Terns on 
Cormorant Rock were about twenty-five birds of this species, and occa- 
sionally three or four were seen along shore. 

Sooty Shearwater (^Puffinus fuliginosus). — In company with the pre- 
ceding species on Cormorant Rock were four birds of this species. None 
were noted around the point, although doubtless they were there at times. 

Leach's Petrel {Oceanodroma leucorhoa). — Five individuals were seen 
skimming the surface of the ocean on our way to Cormorant Rock. Not 
observed close in shore anywhere. 

Surf Scoter (^Oidemia perspicillata). — Several dead birds were seen on 
the beach, and a flock of about a hundred were feeding in the cove east of 
Warren's point. 

Carolina Rail {Porzana Carolina). — Two were seen darting amongst' 
the "cat-tails" on the shore of Long Pond, but no nests were found. 

Florida Gallinule ( Gallinula galeata) . — Three^birds were heard in the 
" cat-tails" of Long Pond and I flushed one which was feeding on the 
shore, while three nests were found but no eggs. 

Semipalmated Sandpiper {Ereujites fusillus). — Aflock of about twenty 
were seen June 4 feeding in the Warren's Point marsh. 

Greater Yellow-legs {Totanus melanoleucus). — Three birds were heard 
whistling and answered our whistle several times in the Warren's Point 
marsh. 

Spotted Sandpiper {Actitis macularia) . — Everywhere abundant along 
shore, especially on Sakonnet Point, where several sets of eggs were found 
in the grass back from the beach, and four young were found just 
hatched on June 5, one of them not being dried oflf. They were all in 
the nest, but the next day on passing here, we found they had left and 
from the anxious cries of the old birds we judged they were some fifty feet 
away. 

Ruby-throated Hummingbird ( Trochilus colubris) . — Two nests of this 
species were found with their complement of two eggs nearly fresh, one 
in a swamp north of Sakonnet Point, and the other in a cedar tree on 
one of the islands in the Warren's Point marsh. 

Wood Pewee (^Contofus virens). — A male was seen on one of the 
islands in the Warren's Point marsh. 




Notes on Rhode Island Ornithology. 



17 



Red-winged Blackbird {Agelaius phoeniceus). — Verj abundant breed- 
ing in the "cat-tails" of Long Pond, and a small pond near the point. 
Newly hatched young and birds just out of the nest and on the wing 
were observed. 

Baltimore Oriole {Icterus galbula). — A pair were nesting in an orchard 
about half a mile north of Sakonnet. 

Grackles {^utscalus, quiscula (^(Btietis ?) ). — A few pairs were breeding 
in company with the Redwings in the " cat-tails " of Long Pond. 

Savanna ^-^AXtow (^Ammodramus sandiuichensis). — The most abundant 
sparrow at Sakonnet. Several nests were found with young just 
hatched and a few on the wing. 

Sharp-tailed Sparrow {Ammodramus caudactitus) . — Several were seen 
in the salt grass of the Warren Point, marsh and one nest with four eggs 
was found. 

Song Sparrow {Melospt'za fasciata). — Nearly as abundant as the 
Savanna and nests were found with young in all stages of growth. 

Bank Swallow {Clivicola riparia). — The most abundant of the Swal- 
lows, there being several colonies along shore, the largest having over a 
hundred nests in close proximity. Eggs and young were found in all 
stages, and one nest had a youngster a week old in which the eggs must 
have been laid by May 13, which is very early. 

White-eyed Vireo ( Vireo iioveboracensis). — Two males were heard in 
the bush pasture north of the point. 

Northern Parula Warbler ( Compsothlypis americana ustiecB~). — Growing 
on the cedar trees on the islands in the Warren's Point marsh, was enough 
usnea for two pairs of this beautiful Warbler to build its nest in. Three 
fresh eggs were found in each. There were probably four or five pairs 
resident here. 

Ovenbird (^Seiurus aurocapillus'). — A male was heard singing in the 
swamp north of the point. 

Maryland Yellow-throat {Geothlypis irickas). — A solitary pair have set- 
tled down in the " cat-tails" of the little pond on the point. The song 
of this particular male is quite different from the resident birds of South 
Auburn, but is in keeping with the song of others of this species which I 
have observed in the southern part of the state. The northern residents 
have a decisive, loud and clear " brig-a-dier, brig-a-dier," " brig-a-dier," 
while the southern birds song is less decisive and more run together. 

Long-billed Marsh Wren ( Cistothortis palustris) . — A solitary pair have 
built their usual quota of five or six nests in the Long Pond " cat-tails." 

Wilson's Thrush (//)//oc/cA/ay"«5ce5ce«5). — A male heard singing in 
the swamp north of the point. 

The following species were also noted during my stay : Black-crowned 
Night Heron (Ajyc^/cor«^ «. iicevhis)^ Bob-white {Colinus virginianus), 
Chimney Swift {CJicetiira pelagica). Kingbird {Tyrannus tyrattttus), 
Crow (Corviis americanus) , 'Qoho\\x\\!i {^DoUchonyx oryzivorus), Cow- 
bird {Molotkrus aier), M.ea.dow\Rrk {Siurnella magna), Vesper Spar- 



i8 



Notes on Rhode Island Ornithology. 



rows (Poocetes gramineus) , Chipping Sparrow {Spizella socialis), Cedar- 
bird {Ampelis cedrorum) Barn Swallow {Htrundo eryhtrogastra) Red- 
eyed Viieo (Vi'reo olivaceus), Yellow Warbler {Dendroica CBstiva)^ Red- 
start {Setofhaga ruttctlla), and American Robin {^Merula tnigratoria). 
South Auburn, June 15, 1900. H. S. Hathaway. 



SPRING ARRIVAL AND DEPARTURE NOTES 1900. 

The notes here given are either earlier or later than those for the species given in 

'The Birds of Rhode Island.' 



Loon (^Gavia ttnber). Twenty, May 28, 
Kittiwake {Rissa tridactyla). One, March 23, 
Herring Gull {Lams a. sviithsonianus). Thirty, May 22, 
Double-crested Cormorant (Phalacrocorax dilophus). 

One, May 17, 
Canada Goose {Bra?iia catiadensis). Forty-five, May 3, 
Brant {Brania bernicla). Eleven, April 28, 
American Coot (^Fulica americana). One, May 28, 
Least Sandpiper (Tringa ininutilla). Two, May 26, 
Greater Yellow-legs {Totanus inelanoleucui) . Two, 

May 26, 
Pigeon Hawk {Falco columbarius). One, April 24, 
Sharp-tailed Sparrow (Ammodramus caudacutus). One, 

May 26, 
Eave Swallow (Petrockelidon lunifrons). Two, April 28, 
Myrtle Warbler {Dendroica corona ta). One, May 10. 
Yellow-breasted Chat {Icieria virens). One, May 23 

and 26, 
Catbird [Galeoscoptes caroh'nensis). One, April 17, 
Alice's Thrush {Hyloctchla alicice'). One, May 20, 



Vicinity 
of Newport, 
Louis di Z. 

Mearns. 



PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED. 

Bird-Lore, Vol. II, No. 3, June, 1900. 

The Auk, Vol. XVII, No. 2, Apr., 1900. 

The Condor, Vol. II, Nos. 2, 3, Mar. and Apr., May and June, 1900. 

The Hummer, Vol. I, No. 9, Mar. 28, 1900. 

The Journal of the Maine Ornithological Society, Vol. II, No. 2, Mar., 
1900. 

The Osprey, Vol. IV, Nos. 6, 7, 8, Feb., Mar. and Apr., 1900. 

The Western Ornithologist, Vol. V, Nos. 2, 3, Mar. and Apr., May and 
June, 1900. 

The Wilson Bulletin, No. 30. Vol. VII, No. i, Jan., 1900 and No. 31 
Vol. VII, No. 2, April, 1900. 



^ 



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The Birds oF Rhode Island 

BY 

REGINALD HEBER HOWE, JR., , 

AND 

EDWARD STURTEVANT, S. B., 

THE FIRST AND ONLY COMPLETE LIST OF 
THE BIRDS OF THE STATE. . . . 



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OCT 



VOL. I 


NO. 4 


1H^,M 




NOTES ON 


RHODE ISLAND ORNITHOLOGY 


■ 


OCTOBER 




1900 


- 






• 

BRISTOL 




RHODE ISLAND 



J. A, ALLEN, F. M. CHAPMAN, 

JEditor. Assoc. Editor 



THE AUK. 



A Quarterly Journal of Ornithology* 

OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE AMERICAN 
ORNITHOLOGISTS' UNION. 

As the official organ of the Union, ' The Auk ' 
is the leading ornithological publication of this 
country. Each number contains about loo pages of 
text, a handsomely colored plate, and other illustra- 
tions. The principal articles are by recognized 
authorities, and are of both a scientific and popular 
nature. The department of ' General Notes ' gives 
brief records of new and interesting facts concerning 
birds, contributed b)' observers from throughout the 
United States and Canada. Recent ornithological 
literature is reviewed at length, and news items are 
commented upon by the editors. 'The Auk' is thus 
indispensable to those who would be kept informed 
of the advance made in the study of birds, either in 
the museum or in the field. 

Price of Current Volume, $3. Single Numbers, 75 cts. 



Address L. S. FOSTER, 

33 PINE STREET, - . = NEW YORK CITY 



OCT^^ 1 



NOTES ON RHODE ISLAND ORNITHOLOGY. 



Vol. I. OCTOBER. No. 



Notes on Rhode Island Ornithology, a qiiarteily publication for 
the purpose of furthering interest in ornithology in the State of Rhode 
Island. Published and edited by Reginald Heber Howe, Jr. Address, 
Longwood, Brookline, Massachusetts. 

Terms, seventy-five cents (.75) a yeai'. Single numbers, twenty cents 
(.20). 

All material for publication, advertisements, and books for review 
should be sent to the Editor. 



\'olume I of " Notes on Rhode Island Ornithology" is completed' with 
the present number. It has been its purpose to put into ornithological 
literature records of Rhode Island birds that otherwise would perhaps 
have never been, recorded, and the Editor believes that the paper can 
claim to have been of value and interest to many. 

The Editor vi'ill assume that the present subscribers wish to continue 
as such unless they notify him at once to the contrary, and all subscrip- 
tion for the ensuing year must be in hand by December 15, igoo, as they 
simply cover the cost of publication and the "Notes" will not be 
continued with a less number of subscribers. It has been thought best 
this year to raise the subscription to one dollar, so that the magazine 
may be large enough to publish a greater part of the material sent in, 
which heretofore has had to be rejected. 



GENERAL NOTES. 



First Record of. the Blue Goose in Rhode Island, with Correction of 
Three Erroneous Records, and Other Notes. — There has been recently 
added to the Charles H. Smith collection at Roger Williams Park, Provi- 
dence, a young male of the Blue Goose which was shot at Noyes Beach, 
Westerly, on March 16, 1S94, by Dr. E. R. Lewis. This is the first 
authentic record for this State, it being a rare bird in all New England. 

There are, however, three erroneous records of this species in the " Birds 
of Rhode Island "by Howe and Sturtevant : one taken at Charlestown 
Beach on Oct. 16, 1S92, by Mr. F. L. Glezen, and two killed at New- 
port and presented by Mr. Newton Dexter to the Brown University collec- 
tion. I have carefully exainined the three specimens and find they are all 
young Lesser Snow Geese {Chen hyperborea). 

Sora Rail {Porzana Carolina). A fine male in breeding pUmiage was 



20 Notes on Rhode Island Ornithology. 

shot at Qvionochontaug, R. I., by Mr. H. H. Burdick, on the unusually 
early date of March 2, 1900. The weather at this time was mild for the 
season, with very little wind. In the collection of Mr. R. J. Davey, of 
Westerly, there is a handsome adult of the Yellow Rail (Porzana nove- 
boi-acensis) which was shot near Westerly during the last week of 
September, 1897. This makes the fifth record for this rare Rail in this 
State. While riding through Wakefield near "Dale Carlia " corners on 
the morning of June 17, 1900, my attention was attracted by the song of a 
Black Poll Warbler, Dendroica striata. This is an unusually late date for 
it, my latest record previous to this being June 7, 1898. There was shot at 
Point Judith, August 5th, 1900, a young Bonaparte's Gull (Lartts Philadel- 
phia). This is quite early for them to reach here, the main body arriving 
usually in late September. 
South Auburn, R. I., Sept. 10,1900. Harry S. Hathaway. 

Notes from Newport. — July 19, 1900, I took off " Purgatory," Middle- 
town, R. I., one American Scaup Duck {Aythya marila). It was a 
cripple and unable to fly. On August 21, 1900, while on Cormorant Rock, 
I saw a Cormorant fly past towards the southeast. It was probably a 
Double-crested Cormorant {PJtalacrocorax dilophus') , but it was too far off 
to determine its species, at all events August 21 is an early date for 
Cormorants to appear here. Mr. Le Roy King took on September 8, 1900, 
a Baird's Sandpiper ( T^'inga bairdii) on the Second Beach marsh. Middle- 
town, so far as we know this is the third record for Rhodq Island. 
For ten days, from August 20 to 31, 1900, there were a great many Black 
Terns (^Hydrochelidon nigra surinamensts) about ; they were seen 
about Narragansett Bay as well as the Ocean, and one was taken on the 
Second Beach marsh by Mr. Le Roy King. They appeared to all be 
young birds. 
Newport, Sept. iS, 1900. Edward Sturtevant. 

The European Ruff [Pavojicella pugnax) in Rhode Island. — One of 
the most interesting captures which has been made in this State for a 
great many years, is a female of this species which was shot in the marsh 
near Seaconnet Point, Little Compton, on July 30, 1900, by Mr. Newton 
Dexter, who kindly permits me to publish the record. This is a widely 
distributed Old World bird, occasionally straggling to America ; there 
being two records for Massachusetts, three for New England and nine 
for North America up to the time of this capture. Mr. Dexter has been 
particularly fortunate in collecting rare birds in this State, especially 
European species, he having taken beside the Ruff a Corn Crake (Crex 
crex) which was killed in Cranston in 1857. 
South Auburn, R. I., Sept. 10, 1900. H. S. Hathaway. 

The Acadian Sharp-tailed Sparrow in R. I. — Mr. J. W. Staintor, of 
Providence, kindly permits me to publish the capture by him of four speci- 



Notes on Rhode Island Ornithology. 2 I 

mens of the Acadian Sharp-tailed Sparrow, Ammodramus iielsoni suhvir- 
gatiis (Dwight), at Charlestown Beach, R. I., on October 15, 1899. At 
the time he was after a partial albino of this species which he flushed from 
the grass in the marsh back of the beach. There were some eight or ten 
birds seen, which were all probably of this subspecies. The albino is 
blotched on the body quite heavily with white, there being about as much 
white as there is normal color. A male has been placed in the Charles H. 
Smith collection at Roger Williams Park, Providence. 
South Auburn, R. I. H. S. Hathaway. 

Birds observed at Chepachet, R. I. — During a collecting trip to 
Chepachet, Providence County, Rhode Island, from August 31 to Sep- 
tember S, 1900, I observed the following-named birds : — 

Wood Duck (Aix sponsa). — A brood was reported at Pascoag Res- 
ervoir during August, 1900. 

Hairy Woodpecker {Dryobates villosus). — Two were seen, and an adult 
female taken September i, 1900. 

Baltimore Oriole {Icterus galbtila). — Eight were seen September i, 
1900. Thi,s is the latest fall record for the State. 

Myrtle W^arbler [Dendroicu coronata). — Arrived in numbers at Che- 
pachet September 7 and 8, 1900. This is the earliest record of their 
arrival within the State. 

Chestnut-sided Warbler {Dendroica fensylvanica). — Abundant beside 
the Chepachet River, wliere it was last seen September 7, 1900. 

Black-poll Warbler {Dendroica striata). — One female taken Septem- 
ber 3, 1900. This seems to be the earliest fall record for Rhode Island. 

Mourning Warbler {Geothlypis Philadelphia). — ^A female, seen Sep- 
tember 4, 1900, is, as far as known to the writer, the only fall record for 
the State. 

The following were also observed : Great Blue Heron {Ardea herodias), 
Green Heron {^A. virescens), Woodcock (Philohela minor)., Solitary Sand- 
piper {^Helodromas solitarius), Ruffed Grouse {Bonasa nrnbellus), Sharp- 
shinned Hawk {Accipiter velox), Cooper's Hawk {A. cooperii), Red- 
tailed Hawk {Buieo borealis), Screech Owl {Megascops asio), Great 
Horned Owl (Bi/bo virgiuiauKs) . Yellow-billed Cuckoo (Coccyzus amer- 
icanus), Black-billed Cuckoo (C erythrophthahnus), Kingfisher {Ceryle 
alcyon). Northern Downy Woodpecker [Dryobates pnbescetis mediatius), 
Northern Flicker {Colaptes auratiis luteus), Chimney Swift {Chcetura 
pelagica), Kingbird {Tyrannus tyrannus), Phoebe (Sayornis phosbe).. Wood 
Pewee {Horizopus virens), Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata), Crow {Corvus 
amerirauus), English Sparrow (Passer domesticus), Goldfinch (Astraga- 
linus tristis). Vesper Sparrow (Pooccetes gramineus), Chipping Sparrow 
(Spizella socialis). Field Sparrow {S. pusilla), Song Sparrow {Melospiza 
fasciata), Rose-breasted Grosbeak (Zamelodia Itidoviciana), Scarlet 
Tanager (Piranga erythromelas), Barn Swallow [Hirundo erythrogastra), 
Cedar-bird {Ampelis cedrorum), Red-eyed Vireo [Vireo olivaceus), Nash- 



22 



Notes on Rhode Island Ornithology. 



ville Warbler {Helmintkophila rubricaptlla), Parula Warbler {Covip- 
sothlypis america?ta usnecB), Oven-bird (Seiuries atirocapillus), Water 
Thrush (5. ttoveboracettsis), Maryland Yellow-throat {Geothlypis irtchas), 
Redstart (^Setophaga ruticilla), Catbird {GaUoscoptes carolineusis), 
Brown Thrasher \^Harporhy7ichiis, ruftcs). White-breasted Nuthatch 
I {Sitta carolineusis), Chickadee {Parus atricapillus) Robin [Meriila 
migratoria), and Bluebird (Sialis sicilis). 
Fort Adams, Newport, R. I. Louis di Zerega Mearns. 

A Rare Capture. — Mr. Newton Dexter writes me that he took a 
Marbled Godwit {^Limosa fedoa') at Sakonnet, R. I., on August 29, 1900. 

Editor. 

Notes from Newport, R. I. — Tryngites subruficollis, Buff-breasted 
Sandpiper. One shot on Sept. 15, 1900, on a lawn near a beach at 
Castle Hill. 

Icterus spurius. Orchard Oriole. Two were seen near Fort 
Adams on June 9 and 22, 1900. 

Icteria virens. Yellow-breasted Chat. Seen throughout June, and 
on Aug. 4 and 5, 1900. 

Louis di Zerega Mearns. 



ARRIVAL AND DEPARTURE NOTES, 1900. 

The notes here given are either earlier or later than those for the species given in 
' The Birds of Rhode Island.' 



Wilson's Tern (Ster?ia hirundo). Abundant, Sept. 26, 

1900; one Sept. 30, 1900. 
Black Tern (Hydrochelidon n. sttrinamensis). One, Sept. 

18, 1900. 
Semipalmated Sandpiper {Ereunetes pusilliis). Three, 

July 14, 1900. 
Spotted Sandpiper (AciMs mactilaria). One, Oct. 3, 

1900. 



Vicinity • 
of Newport, 



Turnstone {Arenaria iiiterpres). Thirty, Sept. 18; six, \ j r),,jc Hi Z 



Oct. 3, 1900. 
Nashville Warbler {Helini7ithophila rub ricap ilia). One, 

Sept. 10, 1900. 
Yellow Palm Warbler [Dendroica p. hypochrysea). Two, 

Sept. 15, 1900. 
Water Thrush {Seiurus noveboracensii). One, Aug. 12, 

1900. 
Pipit {Antkus pensilvanicus). One, Sept. 16, 1900. 



Mearns. 



INDEX TO VOLUME I. 



Acanthis linaria rostrata, 15. 

Accipiter cooperii, 21. 

Accipiter velox, 21. 

Actitis macularia, 16, 22. 

yEgialitis vocifera, 10, 14. 

Agelaius phoeniceus, 10, 17. 

Aix sponsa, 21. 

Alca torda, 3. 

Alle alle, 5. 

Ammodramus caudacutus, 17, 18. 

nelsoni subviigatus, 21. 

sandwichensis savanna, 8, 17. 
Ampelis cedrorum, 18, 21. 
Anas obscura, 3, 8. 
Anthus pensilvanicus, 22. 
Ardea herodias, 5, 21. 
Ardea virescens, 21. 
Arenaria interpres, 22. 
Armstrong, Edward H., 9. 
Asio wilsonianus, 14. 
Astragalinus tristis, 8, 21. 
Auk, Razor-billed, 3. 
Aythya marila, 9, 20. 

Bangs Outram, 7. 

Buteo borealis, 21. 

Blackbird, Red-winged, 10, 11, 16. 

Rusty, 12. 
Bluebird, 8, 9, 11, 22. 
Blue Jay, 21. 
Bobolink, 17. 
Bob-White, 12, 17. 
Bonasa umbellus, 21. 
Brant, 5, 18. 
Branta bernicia, 5, 18. 
Branta canadensis, 4, 5, 18. 
Brewster, William, 7. 
Bubo virginianus, 14, 21. 
BufBehead, 9. 
Bunting, Snow, 14. 
Burdick, H. H., 20. 

Cardinal, Crested, 7. 

Catbird, 12, 18, 22. 

Cedarbird, 18, 21. 

Cepphus grylle, 4. 

Ceryle alcyon, 21. 

Chastura pelagica, 17, 21. 

Chat, Yellow-breasted, 12, 14, 18, 22. 

Chen hyperborea, 13, 19. 

Chewink, 12. 



Chickadee, 4, 22. 

Long-tailed, 4. 
Circus hudsonius, 8. 
Cistothorus palustris, 5, 17. 
Clangula clangula americana, 9. 
Clark, Charles B., 14. 

Isaac, 14. 
Clivicola riparia, 13, 17. 
Coccyzus americanus, 21. 

erythrophthalmus, 21. 
Compsothlypis americana usneae, 22. 
Colaptes auratus luteus, 21. 
Colinus virginianus, 17. 
Colymbus auritus, 3. 
Contopus virens, 16. 
Coot, American, 5. 
Cory, Charles, B., 10. 
Cormorant, 3, 4. 

Common, 4, 8. 

Double-crested, 4, 18, 20. 
Corvus americanus, 17, 21. 
Coues, Elliott, i. 
Cowbird, 11, 17. 
Crake, Corn, 20. 
Crex crex, 20. 
Crossbill, Red, 8, 9, 10. 

White-winged, 8, 9, 10. 
Crow, 17, 21. 

Sea, 5. 
Cuckoo, Black-billed, 7, 12, 21. 

Yellow-billed, 7, 12, 21. 
Cyanocitta cristata, 21. 

Davey, R. J., 20. 

Dendroica sestiva, 18. 

coronata, 18, 21. 

pensylvanica, 21. 

palmarum hypochrysea, 22. 

tigrina, 15. 

striata, 20, 21. 
Dexter, Newton, 3, 19, 20, 22. 
Dolichonyx oryzivorus, 17. 
Dovekie, 5. 
Dowitcher, 7. 
Dryobates villosus, 21. 

pubescens medianus, 21. 
Duck, Black, 3, 8. 

Eider, 3. 

Greater Scaup, 9. 

Harlequin, 3. 

Ruddy, 4. 



24 



Notes on Rhode Island Ornithology. 



Duck, Shoveller, 4. 

^Wood, 21. 
Durfee, Owen, 4. 

Editor, 4, 5, 15, 22. 
Eider. King, 14. 
Ereunetes pusillus, 16, 22. 

Falco columbarius, 18. 
Finch, Purple, 8. 
Flicker, Northern, 21. 
Flycatcher, Crested, 12. 

Least, 12. 
Fulica americana, 5, 18. 

Galeoscoptes carolinensis, 18, 22, 
Gallinule, Florida, 16. 
Gallinula galeata, 16. 
Gavia, imber, 3, 18. 

lumme, 7. 
Geothlypis Philadelphia, 2t. 

trichas, 17, 22. 
Glezen, F. L., 19. 
Godvvit, Hudsonian, 14. 

Marbled, 22. 
Goldfinch, American, 8, 21. 
Goose, Lesser Snow, 13, 19. 

Canada, 4, 5. 18. 

Blue, 19. 
Grackle, 10, 17. 

Bronzed, 11. 
Grebe, Horned, 3. 
Grosbeak, Pine, 8. 

Rose-breasted, 12, 21. 

Grouse, Ruffed, 21. 
Guillemot, Black, 4. 
Gull, Bonaparte's 7, 13, 20. 

Herring, 18. 

Ring-billed, 4, 13. 

Harporhynchus rufus, 22. 
Hathaway, Harry, S., 4, 5, 10, 11, 

14, 15, 18, 20, 21. 
Hawk, Cooper's, 21. 

Marsh, 8. 
Hawk, Pigeon, 18. 

Red-tailed, 21. 

Sharp-shinned, 21. 
Helminthophila rubricapilla, 22. 
Helodromas solitarius, 21. 
Herelda hyemalis, 3. 
Heron, Black-crowned Night, 12, 17. 

Great Blue, 5, 12, 21. 

Green, 21. 
Hill, Julia M., 15. 
Hirundo erythrogastra, 18, 21. 
Histrionicus histrionicus, 3. 



Hodge, C. F. 10. 

Hodgkinson, William, 5. 
Hoffmann, Ralph, 8. 
Horizopus virens, 21. 
Howe, Reginald Heber, Jr., 7, 19. 

Hummingbird, Ruby-throated, 13, 16. 
Hylocichla aliciae, 15, 18. 

fuscescens, 17. 
Hydrochelidon nigra surinamensis, 20. 

Icteria, virens, 14, 18, 22. 

galbula, 17, 21. 

spurius, 13, 14, 22. 
Indigo bird, 12. 

Jefferay, William, i. 
Junco, II. 

hyemalis, 13. 

Slate-colored, 13. 

KiLLDEER, 10, 14, 18. 

Kingbird, 12, 17, 21. 
Kingfisher, 11, 21. 
King, Frederick R., 13. 

LeRoy, 7, 10, 13, 20. 
Kinglet, Ruby-crowned, 12. 
Kittiwake, 3. 

Lark, Horned, 8. 

Larus argentatus smithsonianus, 18. 

delawarensis, 4. 

Philadelphia, 7, 13, 20. 
Lewis, E. R., 19. 
Limosa fedoa, 22. 

haemastica, 14. 
Loon, 3, 18. 

Red-throated, 7. 
Lophodytes cucuUatus, 14. 
Loxia curvirostra minor, 8. 

leucoptera, 8. 

Macrorhamphus, griseus, 7. 

scolopaceus. 
Meadowlark, 17. 
Mearns, Edgar A., 14. 

Louis di Zerega, 15, 22. 
Megascops asio, 21. 
Melanerpes erythrocephalus, 9. 
Melospiza fasciata, 8, 10, 17, 21. 
Merganser, American, 14. 

americanus, 14. 

Hooded, 14. 
Merula migratoria, 9, 10, 18, 22. 
Micropalama himantopus, 3. 
Molothrus ater, 17. 
Murre, Briinnichs, 4, 7, 9, 



Notes on Rhode Island Ornithology. 



25 



Newbury, F. E., 10, 15. 

Nuthatch, White-breasted, 22. 

Nyctea nyctea, 5. 

Nycticorax nycticorax nsevius, 17. 

Oceanodroma leucorhoa, 16. 
Oidemia, 3, 9. 

perspicillata, 9, 16. 
Old-Squavv, 3. 
Oriole, Baltimore, 12, 17, 21. 

Orchard, 13, 14, 22. 
Otocoris alpestris, 8. 
Ovenbird, 12, 17, 22. 
Owl, American Long-eared, 14. 

Barred, 9. 

Great Horned, 14, 21. 

Screech, 21. 

Snowy, 5. 

Parioria cuculata, 7. 
Parus atricapillus, 4, 22. 
septentrionalis, 4. 
Pavoncella pugnax, 20. 
Peckham, Philip, 14. 
Petrel, Leach's, 16. 
Petrochelidon lunifrons, 13, 18. 
Pewee, Wood, 12, 16, 21. 
Phalacrocorax carbo, 3, 4, 8. 

dilophus, 4, 18, 20. 
Philohela minor, 2t. 
Phoebe, 10, 21. 

Pinicola enucleatoa canadensis, 8. 
Pinus spinas, 8. 
Pipit, 22. 

Piranga erythromelas, 21. 
Plectrophenax nivalis, 14. 
Poocetes grammeus, 18, 21. 
Porzana Carolina, 4, 16, 19. 

noveboracensis, 20. 
Powell, H. W. H., 4. 
Puffinus fuliginosus, 1 6. 

gravis, 16. 

borealis, 5. 

Quiscalus quiscula ijeneus, 10. 

Ruff, European, 20. 
Robinson, Wirt, 9. 
Robin, American, 9, 10, 11, 18, 22. 
^Rissa tridactyla, 3, 18. 
Redstart, 12, 18, 22. 
Redpoll, 8. 

Greater, 15. 
Rail, Yellow, 20. 

Sora, 19. 

Carolina, 16. 



Sands, Austin L., 9, 10, 13^ 
F. P., 13. 

Sandpiper, Baird's, 20. 

Buff-breasted, 22. 

Least, iS. 

Pectoral, 3. 

Semipalmated, 16. 

Solitary, 21. 

Spotted, 12, 16, 22. 

Stilt, 3. 
Sayornis phoebe, 10, 21. 
Scoter, 3, 9. 

Surf, 9, 16, 
Seiurus aurocapillus, 17, 22. 

motacilla, 15. 

noveboracensis, 22. 
Setophaga ruticilla, 18, 22. 
Sialia sialis, 9, 22. 
Siskin, Pine, 8, 9. 
Sitta carolinensis, 22. 
Shattuck, George C, 8. 
Shearwater, Cory's, 5. 

Greater, 16. 

Sooty, 16. 
Smith, Charles H., 4, 5, 9, 14, 19, 21. 
Somateria dresseri, 3. 

spectabilis, 14. 
Sora, 4. 

Southwick, J. M., 4. 
Sparrow, Acadian Sharp-tailed, 20. 

Chipping, II, 12, 18, 21. 

English, 2. 

Field, II, 21. 

Savannah, 8, 17. 

Sharp-tailed, 17, 21. 

Song, 8, 10, 17, 21. 

Tree, 14. 

Vesper, 11, 17, 21. 

White- throated, 11. 
Spatula clypeata, 4. 
Spizella monticola, 14. 

pusilla, 21. 

socialis, 18, 21. 
Staintor, J. W., 20 
Sterna, hirundo, i6, 22. 

nigra surnamensis, 22. 
Sturnella magna, 17. 
Sturtevant, Edward, 4, 8, 9, 10, 13, 

19, 20. 
Swallow, Bank, 13, 17. 

Swallow, Barn, 12, 18, 21. 

Cliff, 13. 

Eave, 18. 

Tree, 11. 
Swift, Chimney, 12, 17, 21. 
Syrnium nebulosum, 9. 



26 



Notes on Rhode Island Ornithology. 



Tanager, Scarlet, 12, 21. 

Teal, 4. 

Tern, Black, 20, 22. 

Common, 16. 

Wilson's, 22. 
Thrasher, Brown, 12, 22. 
Thrush, Alice's, 18. 

Gray-cheeked, 15, 

Hermit, 12. 

Louisiana Water, 15, 22. 

Small-billed Water, 12, 13. 

Wilson's, 12, 17. 

Wood, 12. 
Tringa bairdii, 20. 

maculata, 3. 

minutilla, 18. 
Totanus melanoleucus, 2, 16, li 
Trochilus colubris, 16. 
Tryngites ^ubrificollis, 22. 
Turnstone, 22. 
Tyrannus tyrannus, 17, 21. 

Uria lomvia, 4, 7, 9. 

Vireo, noveboracensis, 17. 
olivaceus, 18, 21. 
Red-eyed, 12, 18, 21. 
Warbling, 12. 
White-eyed, 12. 17. 
Yellow-throated, 12. 



Warbler, Black and White, 12. 

Blackburnian, 13. 

Black Poll, 12, 13, 20, 21. 

Black-throated Green, 12. 

Canadian, 13. 

Cape May, 15. 

Chestnut-sided, 12, 21. 

Magnolia, 13. 

Mourning, 21. 

Myrtle, 18, 21. 

Nashville, 2i, 22. 

Northern Parula, 17, 22. 

Prairie, 12. 

Wilson's, 13. 

Yellow, 12, 18. 

Yellow-palm, 12, 22. 

Yellow-rumped, 11, 12. 
Whistler, 9. 
Woodcock, 21. 
Woodpecker, Hairy, 21. 

Northern Downy, 21. 

Red-headed, 9. 
Wren, Long-billed Marsh, 5, 17. 

Yellow-throat, Maryland, 12, 17, ez 
Y ellow-legs, 2, 

Greater, 16, 18. 

Zamelodia ludoviciana, 2t. 



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